Ways to connect in Victorian times

A recent nightly scamper brought me to a new and fascinating exhibit in the Erdman Reading room — a massive collection of beautiful little (almost mouse-sized) cards. Called “visiting” or “calling” cards, their colorful pictures of flowers, lace, and animals caught my eye. What were they for? Read More...

Toothache prompts dental history search

Owww! My little mouse tooth was really hurting. I suffered with a toothache for two days before I got see my favorite dentist (her dental practice is specifically for small rodents) and everything was put right with a drill, a fill and unfortunately, a bill. This got me wondering about dentistry in Monroe County during the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. Who was the first dentist in Monroe County? How did he or she learn about fixing teeth? What were the old-time dental procedures and how are they different from today? Read More...

Surprises in office and in Marshalls Creek

On a recent late night scamper through the mansion office, I came upon a very large and strange resin cast of a fossil. Looking closely, the fossil appeared to be a tooth with rows of cones (cusps) and valleys. What kind of animal could have teeth like that? I had a feeling this tooth was REALLY old. Could it be from a prehistoric animal? Did such animals once live in this area? I was getting excited! How could I find out more? Since it looked like a chomping, chewing tooth, I thought about large prehistoric plant-eating animals like mammoths and mastodons. Did those animals live in Pennsylvania long ago? Read More...

More research on stitchery in the Mansion

In the last Fanlight I shared my new interest in finding out about “old time” stitchery after seeing framed samplers hanging in the Stroud room — one stitched by Jacob Stroud’s daughter Jemima and the other by his granddaughter Sarah. An exciting aspect of researching something is that the deeper you go, the more questions you have and the more you realize what you don’t know Read More...