The 11th Hour on 11th Day of 11th Month

On a recent night scamper I noticed new objects in two first-floor display areas. There are photographs, posters, and uniforms, surrounded by very interesting artifacts. I soon realized the exhibits are about the First World War, which started in 1914 and soon became a global conflict. No wonder it was called “The War to End All Wars.” Read More...

The Fest and the Fun

The garden is an important part of the Stroud Mansion, and on September 2, it again became a great place for families to visit, learn about life in colonial times — when children lived in the Stroud Mansion — and have some “Olde Time Fun!” This report will tell you about my adventures at that event, which shared the day with StroudFest. Read More...

A very special garden

I like to call myself a house mouse, but I also like to go outside. So, on a nice summer day, I sometimes sneak into the garden that surrounds the mansion. In May the MCHA’s Garden Club, which takes care of the garden, sponsored a plant sale. I was there. Nobody saw me, but I was there. Maybe you were, too — digging plants to transfer to your own garden. I hope you were! Read More...

My first conference

While mice (and many other rodents) do not migrate to warmer climates in the winter, I am proud to report that due to my cunning mind and small size, I was able to “go south” for a short but wonderful adventure at the end of February. I accompanied our director Amy (i.e. I snuck into) the 37th Annual Small Museum Conference in Hyattsville, Md.! Read More...

Thinking about butter

Bread and butter crumbs are one of my favorites, and I try to imagine the life in the 1790s, with the big basement fireplace warm and steamy as the Stroud servants are busy making soup, baking bread and churning butter. You can see a butter churn in the kitchen, as well as a fascinating display of beautiful wooden butter mold presses. Read More...

Ways to connect in Victorian times

A recent nightly scamper brought me to a new and fascinating exhibit in the Erdman Reading room — a massive collection of beautiful little (almost mouse-sized) cards. Called “visiting” or “calling” cards, their colorful pictures of flowers, lace, and animals caught my eye. What were they for? Read More...

Toothache prompts dental history search

Owww! My little mouse tooth was really hurting. I suffered with a toothache for two days before I got see my favorite dentist (her dental practice is specifically for small rodents) and everything was put right with a drill, a fill and unfortunately, a bill. This got me wondering about dentistry in Monroe County during the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. Who was the first dentist in Monroe County? How did he or she learn about fixing teeth? What were the old-time dental procedures and how are they different from today? Read More...

Surprises in office and in Marshalls Creek

On a recent late night scamper through the mansion office, I came upon a very large and strange resin cast of a fossil. Looking closely, the fossil appeared to be a tooth with rows of cones (cusps) and valleys. What kind of animal could have teeth like that? I had a feeling this tooth was REALLY old. Could it be from a prehistoric animal? Did such animals once live in this area? I was getting excited! How could I find out more? Since it looked like a chomping, chewing tooth, I thought about large prehistoric plant-eating animals like mammoths and mastodons. Did those animals live in Pennsylvania long ago? Read More...